UNC-Chapel Hill Taskforce on Promoting Emerging Campus Communities

April, 2009

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Executive Summary

The Taskforce acknowledged the increasing diversity among students, faculty, and employees at Carolina, as well as a significant existing presence on campus of communities seeking further visibility. The Taskforce concluded that it was necessary to have:

  • an intentional focus on supporting and promoting multiculturalism to engage all campus ethnic or cultural communities, and furthering the programs and advising capacity for UNC’s existing focus on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, and
  • the establishment of the Carolina Latina/o

RECOMMENDATION 1:A reinvigorated multicultural effort should be led by the existing Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs in collaboration with students, faculty, Student Affairs, academic units, and other centers and offices on campus. To achieve this, a standing and influential Advisory Board on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs should lead, monitor, and evaluate progress towards multiculturalism at Carolina and should serve to advise the Associate Provost for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.

RECOMMENDATION 2:The building or development of a single multicultural space or center was not currently recommended. The building of a center was not seen as the best way now to infuse multiculturalism throughout the campus community. Instead, the Taskforce recommends that the entire university community be explored as a focal point for fostering multiculturalism. Future multicultural space considerations should be determined through the Advisory Board on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.

RECOMMENDATION 3:Outreach to student, faculty, and staff applicants to Carolina should include highlighting UNC’s multicultural makeup and programming. Efforts should be made to make this evident on admissions tours, recruitment visits, and on materials given to applicants for enrollment or employment.

RECOMMENDATION 4:An impressive number of scholars, students, employees, alumni, and community members are already engaged in Latina/o issues at Carolina. The formation of the Carolina Latina/o Center is proposed to connect existing UNC Latina/o-related projects, facilitate communication, improve visibility, and help coordinate new efforts in three main areas: 1. Education, Research and Scholarship, 2. Student life, and 3. Community Engagement.

The goals of this Taskforce were to:

  1. Explore means to promote ethnic, cultural and other affinity group recognition, inclusion and growth at UNC, while building a unified
  2. Identify strategies to attract an increasingly diverse faculty, staff and student body, and build their sense of belonging on the UNC campus.
  3. Plan for the issues and needs raised by emerging campus
  4. Through Carolina’s artistic, scholarly, social and cultural life, identify ways to showcase North Carolina’s increasing
  5. Determine the mission, focus and roles of ethnic centers or programs (Latina/o Center), seeking not to duplicate existing programs or resources.

The plan was to have its deliberations completed by May, 2009. To accomplish its charges, the Taskforce worked as a committee of the whole at times and also established two working groups to separately consider 1) Multiculturalism, and 2) a Latina/o Center. To inform the work of the second group, an on-line campus survey was conducted and a précis of results is included. This Report represents the best expression of the consensus of the Taskforce.

Taskforce Membership:

  • Ronald Bilbao, Junior, Department of Political Science
  • Jakelin Bonilla, First Year, Department of International Studies
  • Pedro Carreño, Senior, Institute for the Study of the Americas
  • Jeff Chen, Senior, Department of History
  • María DeGuzmán, Associate Professor & Director of Latina/o Studies, English and Comparative Literature
  • Archie Ervin, Associate Provost, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs
  • Andrew Hunt, Executive Assistant, Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost
  • Jennifer LaMar, Junior, School of Public Health
  • Valerie Lambert, Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Anthropology
  • Jessica Lee, Associate Professor, Pediatric Dentistry
  • Salvador Mena, Assistant to the Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs
  • Ola Mohamed, Senior, Department of Political Science
  • Doug Morgan, Associate Professor, School of Medicine
  • Christopher Payne, Associate Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs
  • Domenic Powell, Senior, Department of History and International Studies
  • J. Raynor, Senior and Student Body President, Department of Economics
  • John Ribó, Graduate Doctorate and Teaching Assistant, English and Comparative Literature and Romance Languages
  • Sohini Sengupta, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Social Medicine
  • Ron Strauss, Executive Associate Provost, Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost
  • Tyler Thomas, Senior, Department of Exercise & Sport Science
  • Vanessa White, Research Associate and Graduate Student, UNC Center for Aids Research
  • Rachel Willis, Bowman and Gordan Gray Distinguished Associate Professor, Department of American Student and Economics

Multiculturalism at Carolina

Introduction

“The demographics of North Carolina are changing. Between now and 2017, the University of North Carolina General Administration predicts that 30,000 additional students will graduate from North Carolina high schools and that an increasing share of this larger high school population will seek admission to the UNC system. To accommodate these increases, UNC President Erskine Bowles asked each of the system’s campuses to grow their enrollments over the next five to seven years. UNC-Chapel Hill has been asked to admit an additional 4,000 to 5,000 students. If not prepared for carefully and managed properly, this enrollment growth could prove harmful to UNC-Chapel Hill’s quality.”1

While Carolina has to be well positioned to manage an increasingly growing and changing student body over the next decade, it must also position itself to leverage the increasing diversity that comes with growth. Moreover, the current make-up of the Carolina community provides a foundation from which to begin to explore the idea of multiculturalism, and what it will mean for Carolina becoming the best place to teach, learn, and discover.2

Of particular interest to the Taskforce is how historically underrepresented communities will be supported at Carolina in the future and how the University will take advantage of changing demographics as an opportunity for learning, connecting, and celebrating cultures.

An Emerging Vision for Multiculturalism at Carolina

Multiculturalism refers to a community that recognizes, validates, values and promotes the contributions of the diverse cultural heritages, identities and ancestries of all of its people. A multicultural campus community evolves and is strengthened by the inputs of its diverse members, including students, faculty members and employees.

The vision for multiculturalism at Carolina stems from the Taskforce recognizing the need to provide the campus with a discernible vibrant way for members of the campus community to learn about culture and learn from each other. The Taskforce envisions a multicultural effort that through its visibility and outreach would convey to prospective students, faculty, and employees and to the overall campus community the value for diversity at Carolina.

Furthermore, such an effort would allow all members of the Carolina community to see themselves reflected and celebrated. The Taskforce envisions a sustained effort that would provide community members with the opportunities to engage in cultural, social, and educational diversity-related activities while promoting resources to support various ethnic and cultural campus communities.

Reasons for Focusing on Multiculturalism at Carolina

Several reasons for having a concerted focus on multiculturalism at Carolina were identified by the Taskforce:

  • With Carolina aiming to be the school of choice for the best and brightest students and faculty an intentional focus on multiculturalism would make a strong symbolic and practical statement that everyone matters at Carolina. In addition, such a focus conveys the message that engaging with issues of difference and celebrating our diversity are at the core of the Carolina Way.
  • Carolina has already underscored the importance of diversity by creating a senior level Associate Provost for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, adopting an institution wide diversity plan, infusing considerable resources into the recruitment of historically underrepresented students, and supporting campus wide diversity education and collaborations. The timing is right for identifying a how Carolina will serve, foster, and leverage its growing and ever more diverse campus
  • Carolina has a unique opportunity to establish a focus on multiculturalism that seeks to proactively strengthen the already strong bonds that the Carolina community shares and enjoys. The emphasis should be on inclusion and sharing of cultural and social vantage points and educational
  • As a large decentralized institution much is already happening on campus to provide for learning about global, national, state, local, and campus issues related to diversity. A strategic focus on multiculturalism would allow for well thought-out coordination and leveraging of existing campus opportunities and partners to realize the potential that the Carolina community holds in this
  • Lastly, a focus on multiculturalism would serve to validate the presence of, and conduct outreach to, varied communities at Carolina by creating networking and bridging opportunities.

RECOMMENDATION 1:

A multicultural effort should be led by the existing Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs in collaboration with students, faculty, Student Affairs, academic units, and other centers and offices on campus. To achieve this, a standing and influential Advisory Board on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs should lead, monitor, evaluate progress towards multiculturalism at Carolina and should serve to advise the Vice-Provost for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.

The Taskforce recommends that the Advisory Board on Diversity and Multicultural Affairsinclude faculty, student, staff and community members. This Board should be convened by the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs. This group should provide on-going leadership regarding specific mechanisms to operationalize and further multiculturalism at Carolina during a time of change, excitement, and forward momentum towards becoming a more diverse leading University. Periodic reassessment of Carolina’s progress towards multicultural goals should be undertaken by this Board.

RECOMMENDATION 2:

The building or development of a single multicultural space or center was not currently recommended.

The building of a center was not seen as the best way now to infuse multiculturalism throughout the campus community. Instead, the Taskforce recommends that the entire university community be explored as a focal point for fostering multiculturalism in order to link communities, explore intersectionalities, and leverage all existing mediums for promoting a stronger and visible commitment to multiculturalism as part of the Carolina Way. Multiculturalism can be enhanced through the ever more effective use of web presence, residence halls, academic programs, the Student Union, the arts, global efforts, existing identity centers, and the libraries. The ability for smaller, unlinked cultural groups to connect was seen as important for the campus. Some existing organizations, including the existing centers, the Carolina Union, the arts programs, and the libraries, were seen as vehicles to further this capacity.

RECOMMENDATION 3:

Outreach to student, faculty, and staff applicants to Carolina should include highlighting UNC’s multicultural makeup and programming. Efforts should be made to make this evident on admissions tours, recruitment visits, and on materials given to applicants for enrollment or employment. Development of such materials should be monitored by the proposed Advisory Board on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.

Proposal for the Carolina Latina/o Center (CLC)

RECOMMENDATION 4:

An impressive number of scholars, students, employees, alumni, and community members are already engaged in Latina/o issues at Carolina. The formation of the Carolina Latina/o Center is proposed to connect existing UNC-Chapel Hill Latina/o-related projects, facilitate communication, and help coordinate new efforts in three main areas:

  1. Education, Research and Scholarship
  2. Student life
  3. Community Engagement

Definition

Latinas/os are people of Latin American and/or Spanish and/or Portuguese heritage living or working in the United States. Latinas/os are ethno-racially diverse, of African, indigenous, Asian, and European ancestry; linguistically diverse, speaking varieties of English, Spanish, Portuguese, Spanglish, African, Asian, and indigenous languages; and culturally diverse, coming from more than 35 countries and 5 continents. Latina/o Studies takes as its primary concern the experiences and cultural production of these diverse populations in the United States. The term Latina/o is used to be gender inclusive.

Vision Statement

To create a world-class, visible, university center for Latina/o issues including scholarship, education, culture, and community engagement.

Mission Statement

The Carolina Latina/o Center (CLC) will be the best place to teach, learn about, and study Latina/o issues and cultures for the citizens of North Carolina and of the world.

The Carolina Latina/o Center (CLC) will create a UNC-Chapel Hill environment that:

  • provides greater visibility for Latinas/os and for the issues that affect our communities
  • facilitates communication and collaboration among UNC’s diverse faculty, students, alumni, and employees
  • helps stimulate new and interdisciplinary education, research, and scholarship
  • encourages engagement with North Carolina’s changing

Rationale

As a research-intensive university, UNC-Chapel Hill should be at the forefront of cutting-edge, creative education and scholarship on Latina/o issues. The rapid growth of Latinas/os on this campus as well as in the state and nation signals the need for a comprehensive response from UNC-Chapel Hill, as shown by the following statistics:

  • the 2008 entering class of undergraduates at UNC-Chapel Hill was 5.6% Latina/o3
  • in 2007, Latinas/os were 7% of North Carolina’s population and growing rapidly4
  • Latinas/os make up 50.5% of the population growth in the United States in this decade and are projected to be 29% of the U.S. population by 5

To become a more diverse university, UNC-Chapel Hill will need to attract Latina/o students and faculty and provide an environment in which they will feel included, recognized, and respected. The Appendix of this report has a table showing UNC-Chapel Hill admissions trends (2003- 2008) for Latinas/os. Since 2003, there has been an 81% increase in Latina/o applications and a 72% increase in those admitted, with a 74% increase in Latina/o enrollment.

In the spirit of Carolina, true diversity means “to build and sustain an inclusive campus community that values all members of the University.”6

Results of ECC Survey on a proposed Carolina Latina/o Center

On March 2, 2009, the ECC subcommittee on the proposed Latina/o Center launched an online, public survey in order to solicit feedback from faculty, students, employees and community members7. As of April 5, 2009 two hundred eighty-six respondents participated in the survey. Of these participants 59% identified as non-Latina/o, 37% identified as Latina/o, and 4% chose not to respond to this question. Of the respondents 66 were faculty members, 62 were graduate or professional students, 59 were community members, 58 were undergraduate students, 48 were employees of UNC-Chapel Hill, 37 were alumni, and 20 did not identify as any of the aforementioned categories.

The survey consisted of three questions, including feedback on proposed mission of the Center, its priorities, and how current populations could benefit from its creation. Of the 286 respondents, 98% of the responses were overwhelmingly positive.

Concerning the first question, the general reaction to the mission statement was positive with many respondents expressing excitement for the idea and asking for more specifics.

  • “Overall, the mission statement does provide a general impression of the importance of such a project and of the growing influence of the Latina/o community.”
  • “…provides a general idea of the groups that the Center will work with, but is less clear as to exactly how it will work with these groups and exactly what it will do. Again, more specifics could make this section clearer.”

The second question asked respondents to rank the components of the proposed Center in order of preference. The choices included:

  • Academic Programming (e.g. courses, faculty, scholarships, )
  • Research
  • Student Affairs (e.g. student meeting space, resource library, events, )
  • Development (e.g. fundraising for fellowships, professorships, programming, )
  • Advocacy
  • Public Service
  • Other (please specify)

In general, the responses to the top three rank-ordered desired components were as follows:

  1. Academic Programming
  2. Public Service
  3. Student Affairs

Many respondents felt that all components were equally important and should not be ranked:

  • “Very difficult because they go hand in hand.”
  • “I think these are all important and will just accept the order that you have established as perhaps the best for winning support at all levels.”

The third question asked respondents to express how the Center would benefit the work they are already involved with. In general, most of the respondents expressed a connection with Latina/o health issues, advocacy, graduate research, and undergraduate student organizations.

  • “It would create a much needed link between the academic population in the Chapel Hill/Carrboro area and the Latino/a population in the area. For students, facilitating that exchange of information would be the most beneficial way to encourage and foster interest in learning about new cultures and ideas.”
  • “I think the main benefit would be tying already existing resources together – academic and service, etc. There’s so much good stuff happening, but it’s not formally connected.”
  • “The creation of the Latino Center could guide our research institute in the translation of clinical and community based research into practices that may benefit this population.”

What the CLC Would Do

An impressive number of scholars, students, employees, alumni, and community members are already engaged in Latina/o issues at Carolina. The CLC will connect existing UNC-Chapel Hill Latina/o-related projects, facilitate communication, and coordinate new efforts in three main areas:

  1. Education, Research and Scholarship
  2. Student life
  3. Community

1.  Education, Research and Scholarship

The heart of current academic endeavors for the CLC is the UNC Program in Latina/o Studies established in the College of Arts and Sciences in 2004 as the first such program in the Southeast8. The CLC will not duplicate the activities of the UNC Program in Latina/o Studies and will not be an academic unit. In conjunction with the UNC Program in Latina/o Studies, the CLC will seek to facilitate research, scholarship, and educational programming by providing a venue and organizing events that relate to Latina/o issues. Linkages between campus investigators and community agencies and potential participants in research will advance the scholarly aspirations of UNC faculty and students.

Seminars, lectures, research symposia, classes, cultural events, recruitment, and fundraising events will occur in or through the CLC. The CLC will become an interdisciplinary clearinghouse of ideas, connecting the many discrete yet interrelated academic, research and cultural programs already on campus, as well as those that will arise in the future.

The UNC Program in Latina/o Studies will retain its own identity and leadership, will continue to be in the College of Arts and Sciences, and will be a strong academic partner with the CLC.

Research collaborations with the UNC Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Public Health and Business will provide the possibility for increased research funding and enhanced scholarship on Latina/o issues.

The CLC will be a pan-university resource working with the schools, research centers, and institutes at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Some initial areas of academic focus will be:

  • collaborating and promoting new research projects with the UNC School of Medicine, the Center for Latino Health, the UNC School of Dentistry, and the UNC School of Public Health. The CLC will be a resource in designing, implementing and disseminating new UNC research projects.
  • initiating social entrepreneurial efforts in coordination with the Kenan-Flagler School of Business. Specific efforts will focus on both economic growth and rural job creation in North
  • promoting language training by fostering collaboration with the Department of Romance Languages and the UNC School of Education. Specific foci will be on training for teachers for English as a Second Language (ESL) contexts and enhancing the ability of service professionals (healthcare workers, public safety officers, fire fighters, employers) to communicate effectively with this population.
  • working with the Executive Director of the Arts, Carolina Performing Arts, the Ackland Art Museum, and Departments in the College of Arts and Sciences to promote cultural awareness and further the visibility of Latina/o contemporary culture, music and fine
  • fostering cultural and linguistic sensitivity by working in partnership with UNC Diversity and Multicultural Affairs to enact the recommendations in the Diversity Plan Report 2007-20089.
  • linking existing research projects and units to community-based constituencies to enhance research enrollment, community advisory inputs, and the production of appropriate research materials.

2.  Student Life

The CLC will partner with the UNC Division of Student Affairsto further their collaboration with students, faculty, employees, parents, alumni, and community partners. The CLC will provide essential programs and services to enhance student development, personal growth and academic success outside the classroom. These programs and services will seek to challenge and enable students to become compassionate and responsible citizens and leaders of the campus, local, and global communities.

The CLC will partner with UNC Diversity and Multicultural Affairsto provide university- wide leadership in developing and implementing initiatives that build access to UNC and diversity within the campus community.

The CLC will help campus partners provide support to undergraduate, professional, and graduate students by connecting the many existing student-driven initiatives and groups interested in Latina/o issues related on campus10. Student campus groups will continue to be housed in the Carolina Union but the CLC will provide a common locus for interaction with faculty, employees, other students, and community members.

The CLC will foster inclusive, culturally diverse residential and learning campus environments. The CLC will build sustained relationships with Housing and Residential Education (UNC Division of Student Affairs), and in particular to the Spanish Language Residence program and the Summer School’s Spanish Intensive Program. Mutually beneficial endeavors will be facilitated by being located in a Residence Hall context.

3.  Community Engagement

The CLC will work with the Carolina Center for Public Service, the Center for Faculty Excellence, and the Vice Chancellor for Engagement and Public Service to further the Latina/o aspects of the UNC Tomorrow initiative and it’s Community-Campus Partnership for Tomorrow. In specific, the CLC will seek to promote engagement, service and engaged scholarship in a manner that will build balanced, respectful and effective linkages to NC communities, Latina/o research participants, and policy makers.

The CLC will help UNC reach out to Latina/o communities in North Carolina through initiatives that connect students, faculty, and employees with community agencies, service groups, schools and other organizations.. Having a Latina/o context on campus will offer faculty and students expertise, linguistic and cultural access and guidance. The CLC will promote and facilitate public service, research and engagement organized on and off the campus and will link these efforts to existing Latina/o groups11.

Proposed Organization

Similar in scope and purpose to other campus-wide centers and institutes, the CLC will report to the Associate Provost for Academic Initiatives. The CLC will be reviewed by the Centers and Institutes Committee which will forward its recommendation to the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor.

  • Development plan: The CLC will seek donors and external grant funding with the assistance of the Development Office, the Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development, the Provost’s Office, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, Student Affairs, the Carolina Center for Public Service and the Chancellor’s office. Start-up and pilot program expenses will be minimal due to a plan to leverage and use existing resources, and because realistically limited (if any) funding support can currently be provided by university sources. A Business Plan will be developed in the first 1-2
  • Director: Initially the directorship will be vacant, but in the future a full-time position will be sought for a Director as resources become available. As the activities of the center expand and further resources become available, additional positions may be considered, with the possibility of an Associate Director in a fully mature
  • Advisory Board: The CLC’s Advisory Board will initially consist of faculty members, employees, students, alumni, community members, and administrators. The Advisory Board will include university and community stakeholders12. It will meet on a quarterly basis in the initial year. The inaugural Advisory Board will be named by the Office of the Provost. Board terms and provisions for member replacement will be developed by the Advisory Board.
  • Staffing: The CLC will initially seek a small staff of graduate students, volunteers, and work-study students. As resources are identified permanent administrative staff would be hired to meet increasing programmatic
  • Proposed Space: In collaboration with the Division of Student Affairs and Housing and Residential Education, it is proposed that the CLC utilize space in the first floor suite in the Craige North Residence Hall. This suite has several office spaces, a gallery, two well- equipped classrooms and a social space with round tables and chairs for gatherings. The suite permits security to be preserved for the Residence Hall as there are card-readers that control access to the residential areas from the suite.

This location is visible and easily accessible to all on campus and in the community. The location should foster mixed-use for endeavors related to academic endeavors, student life, and community engagement. It is particularly well located for collaboration with strategic partners such as the UNC Schools of Medicine, Dentistry and Public Health and the Kenan-Flagler Business School.

Proximity to residential space is highly beneficial for those in the CLC as well as students housed in the Residence Hall. It is hoped that in the future the “Spanish House” language intensive residence and the Summer School’s Spanish Intensive Program would be relocated to the same building and that mutual programming and learning opportunities would be fostered. A CLC Working Group will be formed in partnership with the Division of Student Affairs and Housing and Residential Education to explore and build relationships and plans for space use and programming with their work beginning in Summer, 2009. It is understood that existing classroom spaces and other non-office spaces will not be converted to offices in this move. Furthermore, all efforts will be made to encourage students to utilize the available space in this suite on an active basis and that students would be welcomed, not displaced, by the CLC.

CLC Implementation Schedule:

  • Review from the Centers and Institutes Committee (recommendation to the Provost – Spring, 2009)
  • Provost approval (Spring, 2009)
  • Form and launch CLC Advisory Board (Spring-Summer, 2009)
  • Establish CLC Working Group in partnership with the Division of Student Affairs and Housing and Residential Education to explore and build relationships and plans for space use and programming (Summer, 2009)
  • Occupy office spaces in Craige North Residence Hall with volunteer and/or work study students, especially graduate students (Summer,2009)
  • Plan and formulate initial programs for CLC (Fall 2009).
  • Develop Business Plan and development efforts (Fall 2009-2010)
  • Plan to relocate “Spanish House” for Fall, 2010 (plan in Fall-Spring 2009-2010).
  • Formally dedicate the CLC (Spring 2010); install
  • Plan for future “Faculty In-Residence” capacity with Housing and Residential Education.

Submitted by the Taskforce on Emerging Campus Communities, April 20, 2009

Table 1: Latina/o Admissions Trends UNC-Chapel Hill 2003-2008

Applications200320042005200620072008Change% Change
Hispanic/Latino/Latina6137547478338601,11149881.2%
All17,90919,05318,70619,73620,06421,5073,59820.1%
Admits200320042005200620072008Change% Change
Hispanic/Latino/Latina29334337140044650421172.0%
All6,4436,7366,7406,7346,9937,30986613.4%
Admit Rate200320042005200620072008Change% Change
Hispanic/Latino/Latina47.8%45.5%49.7%48.0%51.9%45.4%‐2.4%‐5.1%
All36.0%35.4%36.0%34.1%34.9%34.0%‐2.0%‐5.5%
Enrolled200320042005200620072008Change% Change
Hispanic/Latino/Latina1251301642052212189374.4%
All3,5153,5893,7513,8163,8953,8643499.9%
Yield200320042005200620072008Change% Change
Hispanic/Latino/Latina42.7%37.9%44.2%51.3%49.6%43.3%0.6%1.4%
All54.6%53.3%55.7%56.7%55.7%52.9%‐1.7%‐3.1%

References:

  1. http://stronger.uncwc.webfactional.com/images/uploads/09_Board_of_Trustees_Report_web.pdf
  2. http://stronger.uncwc.webfactional.com/images/uploads/09_Board_of_Trustees_Report_web.pdf
  3. http://admissions.unc.edu/academics/factsandfigures.htm
  4. http://pewhispanic.org/states/?stateid=NC
  5. http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.php?ReportID=85
  6. http://www.unc.edu/diversity/about.htm
  7. http://www.unc.edu/ecc
  8. http://english.unc.edu/latina-o/UNCLatResources.html
  9. http://www.unc.edu/diversity/dplayoutsm.pdf
  10. Please refer to the graphic on page 12 for a list of student groups that potentially will be participants in the CLC.
  11. Please refer to the graphic on page 12 for a list of community groups that potentially will be participants in the CLC.
  12. CLC Advisory Board members will be from the following units:
  • Selected faculty representatives from several units
  • Research Centers and Institutes
  • Student Affairs
  • UNC Center for Latino Health
  • Diversity and Multicultural Affairs
  • Students and Student Government (undergraduate and graduate/professional)
  • Faculty Governance
  • Employee Forum
  • Campus Y
  • Carolina Center for Public Service
  • Community organizations

Working Charges for the Taskforce

  1. To examine and make recommendations about how to promote ethnic, cultural and other affinity group recognition, validation, inclusion and growth at UNC while building the sense of a broad and unified university.
  2. Consider strategies to attract and cultivate an increasingly diverse faculty, staff and student body, and build their sense of belonging on the UNC
  3. Assess and plan for the issues and needs raised by emerging campus
  4. Consider and plan for showcasing the increasing pluralism in the State of North Carolina in the artistic, scholarly, social and cultural life of the UNC
  5. Determine the mission, focus and roles of a Latina/o Center, or other ethnic centers, seeking not to duplicate existing programs or resources. In this process consider:
    1. Academic and research roles
    2. Community outreach; recruitment, retention and admissions
    3. Faculty presence and capacity
    4. Student needs and expectations
    5. Organization and administration; space needs
    6. Funding and infrastructural needs
    7. Timetable